"OSHA warns workers that cleaning chemicals can cause health problems including wheezing, coughing, skin rashes, itchy eyes, skin burns, sore throat, headaches, dizziness, asthma and nosebleeds, among other problems. In general, the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) these chemicals can release into the air contribute to indoor air pollution, which can cause negative health effects for anyone in the work area."

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"When you think about hazardous chemicals in the workplace, the first ones that come to mind may not be cleaning chemicals. Chemicals used for cleaning, though, can pose a number of hazards to worker health and safety, especially for workers who use them on a daily basis like janitorial staff."

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"Before you start scrubbing every surface in sight, consider that obsessive cleaning with caustic household cleaners has its own drawbacks. Harsh household cleaners can affect a baby's eyes, airways, skim, and more."

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"Women with spic and span homes could be twice as likely to get breast cancer. A study found a potential link between the use of cleaning chemicals and breast cancer risk. We clean our house to keep it free from harmful contaminants. We normally equate clean with commercial cleaning products to take away dirt and filth not knowing its introducing toxic chemicals into our home. Cleaning chemicals may contribute to breast cancer because it contains mammary gland carcinogens and endocrine disrupting chemicals. "

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"Cleaning, sanitizing, and disinfecting in ECE reduces the risk of infectious disease and removes allergens and irritants that cause or trigger asthma and allergies. But many cleaners, sanitizers, disinfectants, and fragrances, even those marketed as “green”, can pollute the air, water, and soil. "

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"In today’s diverse market, cleaning product manufacturers are faced with the challenge of balancing two important goals: Creating effective cleaning products for a wide variety of applications that remove indoor pollutants such as dust, viruses, bacteria, particulates, endotoxins, allergens and mold, while not adding pollutants, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulates, back into the indoor air. All of these indoor contaminants can make people sick, including triggering allergy and asthma attacks."

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"Workplaces, such as schools, hospitals, hotels, restaurants and manufacturing plants, use cleaning chemicals to ensure the cleanliness of their buildings. Workers who handle these products include building maintenance workers, janitors and housekeepers. Some cleaning chemicals can be hazardous, causing problems ranging from skin rashes and burns to coughing and asthma. Many employers are switching to green cleaning products because they are thought to be less hazardous to workers and the environment."

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